CoQ10- The Everywhere ENERGY Nutrient

Brandi Grimmer
CPhT, CNC keystonenutrition
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Coenzyme Q10 has been proven to be a very beneficial nutrient. The problem is not enough people are taking it.  Coenzyme Q 10 (ubiquinone) is a vital vitamin- like substance you body relies on quite extensively for many biological processes. The main role of coenzyme Q10 is in the production of energy (ATP). It converts the energy from fats and sugars into usable energy the cells and tissues can use. Without enough CoQ10 cells will starve for energy, become weak and eventually die. Think of CoQ10 as the spark plug to your car. The heart is the most energy demanding muscle in the body, and is where the most CoQ10 is needed. Many people on “statin” drugs may complain of muscle soreness and weakness (myalgia), which has been linked to a deficiency of CoQ10. Some studies have also suggested that congestive heart failure is due primarily to inadequate production of CoQ10.

It is especially important if you are on a “statin” drug. These drugs, aimed at lowering cholesterol, also block the synthesis of CoQ10. Even those not taking “statins”, could still benefit from CoQ10. Many other prescription drugs also deplete CoQ10 levels, and the normal aging process reduces levels by 72%. Any strenuous exercise also increases the body’s demands for CoQ10. Those with chronic diseases such as, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson’s disease, all are deficient.

Since CoQ10 is not supplied in great enough amount from our diet, it needs to be supplemented. This is the ideal means of increasing CoQ10 levels. Typical dose is 100-200mg daily, but doses as high as 1200mg have been studied without any adverse side effects. The synthesis of coenzyme Q10 also requires an adequate amount of riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), cobalamin (B12), folic acid, vitamin C, and other trace minerals. Should you have any other questions regarding coenzyme Q10, please contact me.
** As always, whenever starting a new medication or supplement regimen, please talk with your doctor.
Sinatra, Stephen T, MD. The Coenzyme Q10 Phenomenon. 1998.

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